Project Description

If you would like to talk to someone about sexuality and gender identity you can get in touch with us at Centre 33 or with  The Kite Trust

LGBTQ+ – What does it mean?

  • LGBTQ+ stands for lesbian, gay, bi, trans, queer (or questioning) and ‘plus’, which includes other sexual identities. Even though they’re often referred to together, sexuality isn’t the same as gender identity.

Centre 33 at the first Cambridge Pride June 2019

Gender Identity – what is it?

  • Gender identity refers to your sense of your own gender. You might feel that your gender is female or male, or you might feel that your gender identity doesn’t fit naturally into either of these two categories.
  • Your gender identity may or may not be the same as the sex you were assigned at birth (this is the sex you were given based on your physical body at birth).
  • People who feel that the sex they were assigned at birth doesn’t sit comfortably with their sense of self (their self-identified gender) might describe themselves as trans.
  • People whose gender is male and who were assigned female at birth might describe themselves as trans men.
  • People whose gender is female and who were assigned male at birth might describe themselves as trans women.
  • People who feel that their gender identity doesn’t fit comfortably into the categories of either ‘male’ or ‘female’ might describe themselves as non-binary or genderqueer.
  • There are lots of non-binary identities. Some non-binary people might feel that their gender identity is a mix of being both male and female, or that it is somewhere in between, moves between the two, or is something completely different.
  • People who feel that their gender matches the sex they were assigned at birth may be referred to as cisgender (or cis).
  • People who identify as not having a gender might refer to themselves as agender.

The sexual orientations and gender identities described on this page are not new.  The language that’s used by people to describe themselves changes over time, but people with many different sexual orientations and gender identities have existed for centuries in many societies around the world.

You can’t choose your sexual orientation or gender identity, just like you can’t choose who you fall in love with.

No one else can tell you what your sexual orientation or gender identity is, only you know how you feel.

Although sexuality and gender identity are important, they are only a part of what makes up a whole person.  People of all sexual orientations and gender identities deserve to be accepted and treated with respect.

Other useful terms

Pride –  Pride refers to a worldwide movement and philosophy asserting that LGBTQ+ people should be proud of their sexual orientation and gender identity.  June is Pride month and many events are held all over the world to recognise the impact that LGBTQ+ people have had, and to promote equality and tolerance.

Ally – An ally is (usually) a cis and/or straight person who takes action to support members of the LGBTQ+ community.

Sexuality – What is it?

  • Sexuality and sexual orientation is about who you want to have relationships with and who you’re physically and emotionally attracted to.
  • There are many sexual orientations. You might identify with one of the sexual orientations below, or another sexual orientation might sit more comfortably with how you feel.
  • People who are attracted to people of the same gender often call themselves gay. Gay women may call themselves lesbian.
  • People who are attracted to people of a different gender often call themselves heterosexual or straight.
  • People who are attracted to both women and men often call themselves bisexual (or bi).
  • People who are attracted to people of any sexual orientation or gender might call themselves pansexual (or pan).
  • People who do not feel sexually attracted to anyone might call themselves asexual.
  • While some young people are certain about their sexual orientation, others aren’t so sure and it can be normal to question your sexual orientation.
  • If you are feeling worried or unsure, be patient and trust your feelings. Accept that your romantic and sexual feelings toward others may change as you begin dating and having relationships, but eventually, you’ll know what feels right.

Gender Identity – what is it?

  • Gender identity refers to your sense of your own gender. You might feel that your gender is female or male, or you might feel that your gender identity doesn’t fit naturally into either of these two categories.
  • Your gender identity may or may not be the same as the sex you were assigned at birth (this is the sex you were given based on your physical body at birth).
  • People who feel that the sex they were assigned at birth doesn’t sit comfortably with their sense of self (their self-identified gender) might describe themselves as trans.
  • People whose gender is male and who were assigned female at birth might describe themselves as trans men.
  • People whose gender is female and who were assigned male at birth might describe themselves as trans women.
  • People who feel that their gender identity doesn’t fit comfortably into the categories of either ‘male’ or ‘female’ might describe themselves as non-binary or genderqueer.
  • There are lots of non-binary identities. Some non-binary people might feel that their gender identity is a mix of being both male and female, or that it is somewhere in between, moves between the two, or is something completely different.
  • People who feel that their gender matches the sex they were assigned at birth may be referred to as cisgender (or cis).
  • People who identify as not having a gender might refer to themselves as agender.

The sexual orientations and gender identities described on this page are not new.  The language that’s used by people to describe themselves changes over time, but people with many different sexual orientations and gender identities have existed for centuries in many societies around the world.

You can’t choose your sexual orientation or gender identity, just like you can’t choose who you fall in love with.

No one else can tell you what your sexual orientation or gender identity is, only you know how you feel.

Although sexuality and gender identity are important, they are only a part of what makes up a whole person.  People of all sexual orientations and gender identities deserve to be accepted and treated with respect.

Other useful terms

Pride –  Pride refers to a worldwide movement and philosophy asserting that LGBTQ+ people should be proud of their sexual orientation and gender identity.  June is Pride month and many events are held all over the world to recognise the impact that LGBTQ+ people have had, and to promote equality and tolerance.

Ally – An ally is (usually) a cis and/or straight person who takes action to support members of the LGBTQ+ community.

If you would like to talk to someone about sexuality and gender identity you can get in touch with us at Centre 33 or with  The Kite Trust

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